Recirc
A recently launched Atlantic salmon producer plans to build a network of land-based RAS farms across Europe, Asia and North America with a projected annual production capacity of 260,000 tons of fish.
Aquaculture is relatively new in Mozambique, but the culture of freshwater species such as tilapia has existed for decades. High in protein value and palatability, tilapia are a key focus due to their high growth rate and ability to breed easily and naturally in captivity.
NORWAY – Skretting Aquaculture Research Centre (ARC) recently expanded its Lerang Research Station in Stavanger, Norway to include a “state-of-the-art” recirculation hall. The company says the expansion will enable researchers to conduct precise experiments on its latest closed system feed formulations in strict, closely monitored environmental conditions.
Dubai’s Vikings Label plans to build a large, land-based salmon farm, and has tapped Gråkjær to be its contractor.
The government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, has come out solidly behind Grieg NL Seafarms Ltd's massive aquaculture project with the announcement by Premier Dwight Ball of a $30-million investment from the government.
The Fynest Caviar Co. can now proceed with finalizing plans to build a closed containment RAS on Loch Fyne in Cairndow, Scotland after the concept received the go-ahead from Argyll and Bute council’s planning committee.
Kingfish Zeeland, which operates a new RAS production facility for yellowtail kingfish (Seriola Lalandi) in the Netherlands, has confirmed that it’s started to sell product into the United States through its Florida partner Candor Seafood.
Ideal Fish has officially opened its brand new land-based aquaponic facility in Waterbury, Connecticut, in the United States, spanning 63,000-sq-ft of recirculating aquaculture system (RAS).
I remember when “organic” was just a basket full of spotted apples in the corner of the produce section. It’s not that anymore.  
Compared to on-shore grow-out farms, where water is pumped through tanks and raceways, fish hatcheries and nurseries use significantly less water. The reason is that the biomass produced in these facilities is normally 10 to 100 times smaller than in grow-out farms. So, why is there a need for RAS technologies in fish hatcheries?
A freshwater director for one of the world’s leading salmon producers explains how closed containment fits into the company’s corporate strategy going forward.
Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS) present us with an alternative to seawater net-pen aquaculture.  The recent struggles with net pen licenses, and legislation in general, have made it difficult in many countries to expand current sea farms or create new ones.  
Consider these two scenarios: Business A – Fish enters farm at two grams in September and reaches 30g two years later; Business B – Same species of fish enters farm at two grams in October and reaches 30g in nine months.  
In 2013, the European Union’s food sector was a major consumer of energy, accounting for 26 per cent of final energy consumption. Agriculture and livestock production were responsible for 33.4 per cent of the energy costs associated with food consumed in the EU.
Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) technology development has been and continues to be a melding of borrowed engineering. Components of RAS originate from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment industries with applied research and development specifically on aquaculture technologies by academics in public and private institutions, as well as a little creative ingenuity provided by farmers, consultants and system suppliers.
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