Profiles
Dunkeld Trout Hatcheries leverages its location in South Africa to supply off-season demand from the other side of the equator.

Justin Henry thinks he’s got some pretty good fish eggs for sale. Northern Divine Aquafarms produces certified organic, fertilized, female monosex, coho salmon eggs. “I think we are the only company in the world doing this,” says Henry, the General Manager of Northern Divine, based in Sechelt, just north of Vancouver, British Columbia in Canada.

Red sea bream (Pagrus major) has been eaten in Japan for at least 5,000 years. It's featured prominently in festive occasions because the Japanese word for the species, madai, sounds like medetai, meaning auspicious or joyous. It's also an important species for Japan's commercial aquaculture sector. Its fast growth rate and ability to spawn naturally in captivity makes it economically advantageous and particularly attractive.

The Beluga sturgeon (Huso huso Linnaeus, 1758) has a decreasing population trend and is classified as critically endangered in the Black- and Azov seas, and regionally extinct in the Adriatic Sea. It is extirpated from the upper parts of almost all the European spawning rivers (e.g. Danube, Dniester, Dnieper, Don, Kuban, Terek and Volga) mainly because of overfishing and dams that block migration routes.

Sunland Hatchery is set in idyllic surroundings near Lake Cootharaba on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast. The hatchery (established in the ‘70s) spawned Australian native species and raised them for private and public stockings, and once was the country’s largest producer of Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata).

‘Río Pescado’ (River Fish, in Spanish) is one of the oldest hatcheries in Chile and the first to operate in the region of Los Lagos, in the heart of the local salmon industry.

“Our original stock was created by making crosses between many different types of regional African catfish strains which we gathered from all over Africa,” says Fleuren and Nooijen co-owner, Bert-Jan Roosendaal.

Mysis diluviana, a non-native species, was introduced into Okanagan Lake in British Columbia during the early 1960s in hopes that it would help support a dwindling Kokanee (landlocked sockeye salmon) sport fishery.

High among the Andean mountains of Peru, at 3100m (10,230 ft), in the cordillera popular with visiting mountaineers and hikers, is the small village of San Bartolommeo de Acopalca. It has a population of about 225 families.

Lucky Clays Fresh was launched in 2011 at Norwood, North Carolina when owner Judy Carpenter expanded her existing farm to include a demonstration sized aquaponics system.

The Finlayson family—patriarch Wayne and sons Brad and Shaun—of Bagdad, 40km north of Hobart, Tasmania are building a recirculating aquaculture system to grow-on eels (Anguilla australis) captured in the wild.

Ever since he was a young boy exploring the flood plain of a brook near his childhood home in New Jersey shellfish biologist Rick Karney has always been fascinated by the natural world around him.

Huon Aquaculture is at the forefront of innovation in Tasmania’s salmon farming sector. Their new hatchery/smolt production facility at Forest Home, Judbury, on the Huon River, is part of that innovation.

The Richard Cronin National Salmon Station has a new role as a regional center to research, rear and restore threatened aquatic species. “This is very much a cooperation to develop resources and research facilities,” says David Perkins of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, who is director of the re-named Richard Cronin Aquatic Resource Center.

“Trout fishing in particular in west North Carolina is big business,” says Adam Moticak. “These communities in western North Carolina rely on these fish to be stocked in the various bodies of water.”

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